Monday, July 23, 2012

Dog Bloggers Unite for Rescue


Even though I got Elka from a breeder, I do what I can to support dog rescue, and Doberman rescue, as well. 

Rescue is more than just driving cute puppies around, or finding a box of them on the doorstep. Rescue is heartbreaking, intense, and grueling work. I have nothing but admiration and thanks for people who are on the front lines in the rescue of any breed, and any animal. It takes guts, and stubbornness and patience. It takes faith that there will be money, that there will be a spot, that a vet can be found and a home.

Dog rescue relies heavily upon donations, of time, money, and supplies. Dog rescue survives because of peoples' generosity, and their unwillingness to let the cruelty or inattention of others to go unanswered.

Real dog rescue, where lives are saved, struggles and triumphs every day.

Real dog rescue is what took thirteen emaciated Dobermans, now twelve, from the home of a woman in Conklin, New York. The Broome County Humane Society is to thank for that, and the concerned citizen who reported his or her suspicions. Two of those dogs have found homes, and the other ten are evidently being made available for adoption next week, so they're accepting applications.

Real rescue is Doberman Rescue Unlimited, who takes in those Dobermans whose families had another baby. The Dobermans whose people are moving, and didn't find an apartment that takes dogs, or found an apartment that bans Dobermans specifically. DRU takes those dogs that ended up with same sex aggression when they reached maturity, the Dobermans who have thyroid disorders or Dilated Cardiomyopathy. The Dobermans who were "too energetic" and strong for their owners. 

There's the Doberman Assistance Network, that pulls Dobermans out of kill shelters and gets them into foster or rescue groups all over the country. People who transport dogs for them aren't paid to do so, or at least not in money. They volunteer their time, and are paid in thanks. A pregnant Doberman, dumped into DAN's hands, just had puppies not long ago. Who abandons their pregnant dog?

There's a Doberman who came to Distinguished Doberman Rescue because she got fleas....so her family decided to keep her outside instead. Without treating her. 

Then there are smaller ways to help. Freekibble.com donates kibble daily to dogs (and cats) in animal shelters. You just need to answer a question; you don't even need to get it right.

Every purchase on HelpingUdders.com will donate a percentage to the rescue of your choice.

A lot of people don't think about rescue, or don't think that rescue has pure breeds. A lot of pure breed rescues are in fact pretty full, and a lot of those dogs are surrendered for the same reason dogs end up in shelters: they're too big, too energetic, too destructive, etc. etc. Many people who get rid of their dogs do so rather than putting the time in to make their rather normal dog a good canine companion. They don't come out of a box like that, people! 

So, for your next dog, consider adoption or rescue. Look into what organizations exist around you. Taking one of these dogs in can be more rewarding than you realize!





23 comments:

  1. This is definitely a great post. I am touched and inspired at how people can have big hearts.

    Thank you for sharing this. I have wanted to participate in this rescue post but I am still thinking of something to write.

    Huggies and Cheese,

    Haopee

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    1. It is amazing the way that people can really pull together and do such good for dogs in need!

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  2. lovely post. Happy Monday to you all.
    Best wishes Molly

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    1. Thank you! Hope you have a great week ^^

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  3. thanks for the great links! didn't know about Freekibble before x

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    1. I forget how I first heard about them, but I do so love Freekibble, and try to sing their praises whenever possible!

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  4. Great post. The thing about breed rescue is that it is usually supported by those that love the breed and the breeders that devote their lives to the breed. Also, they are usually very honest about any quirks the dogs might have because they understand and can evaluate the breed.

    A few years ago, Chessie rescue had some dogs and they were surrendered for the reasons you list. However, due to the economy many are now surrendered due to housing concerns. I hope that will change soon.

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    1. It's a sorry thing, when even the dogs have to worry about the economy :(

      It's funny to me how many people don't know about breed rescue. Some people think that pet stores are the only place to get animals....clearly, they don't know how to research!

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  5. There are many pure breeds at pounds here too. Many people just don't realise it. Rufus was a pure Malamute. He was dumped twice before we picked him up and after we did, people in the street wanted one exactly like him. We would direct them to the pounds, but at least one that we know of ended buying from a breeder, sadly.

    As for The Other Half and me, we're fans of The Mutt and there are heaps of those at pounds too :)

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    1. I think most dogs that I've known have been mutts...I'm certainly not against them!

      There are just far too many dogs in all pounds...and shelters....and rescues...and in foster care. Too many.

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  6. Thanks for participating in Bloggers Unite for Dog Rescue. You are right - dog rescue is heartbreaking, backbreaking work and dog rescuers are a special breed of people. They are in the trenches day after day after day. If someone is interested in obtaining a pure breed dog, they should definitely look into dog rescue organizations!

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    1. My pleasure...how could I not? ^^

      Rescuers have far more heart and dedication than I do. Really, I talk a good game, but I'm afraid I might just be a wimp when it comes to the sort of fortitude needed to get right in the trenches.

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  7. Great shout out to the dedicated breed rescue organizations. I'm amazed at how few people know they exist.

    Was glad to hear the dogs taken from the Conklin woman are almost ready to go to homes. The link wouldn't load for me but I had been wondering about this since you shared the news last month.

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    1. Sorry about the link, I replaced it with one that might be a bit better (though my area has been having some hella bad Internet issues). I've been wondering about them too, really, but coverage as always is sketchy.

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  8. Great post! Even though Nola is from a breeder, I'm an advocate for rescue
    Nola's Mom

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    1. Ditto that....Elka is from a breeder, though I love pointing people at rescue when I can!

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  9. This is a beautiful post. Very moving and honest. Those on the front lines of rescue deserve so much respect and admiration. I believe those who really love their breed support their breed in rescue. Thank you for this post.

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    1. Thank you for reading!

      I have much gratitude, respect, and admiration for all of those wonderful folks who rescue, because it truly is out of the goodness of their hearts, and driven by their own conviction. They are priceless, and irreplaceable.

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  10. DRU is actually the group that referred us to a local group called C.A.R.E. - which is where my hubby and I adopted our dobe Harley from. He was badly abused, yet he was still an awesome dog with a great temperament. (I miss him terribly). It is amazing what dogs are put through, and they still find it in their hearts to trust us humans. Thanks for telling your readers about all of these wonderful groups that are helping dogs. (So sad to hear about the emaciated ones, I hope they all find great homes.)

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    1. Dogs' ability to love and forgive is a wonderful and amazing thing!

      I'm sorry that you miss your Harley...he must have been so very wonderful.

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